Nerdstalgia

Silvaaris, The Playwright

“AAARRGGGH” The giant roared as his club came swinging down.

Korizan dodged out of the way as he plunged his sword into the creature. The giant staggered back, it knew the end was near.

The giant swung again, this time knocking Korizan down with a crushing blow.

Korizan looked up, dazed. He rolled out of the way before the club could come crashing down on his head.

A loud crackled filled the air as a blue bolt of energy zipped into view. The giant let out a yelp in agony as it crashed down to the ground.

Korizan smiled, Lisus the mage save him yet again with a well placed evocation. The two nodded in appreciation for another battle won. The looked around the scene to find their missing companion. Had he fallen to the giant without them realizing it? Or was he up to his usual tricks?

Lisus looked behind a pile of rubble and saw Silvaaris with his notebook in hand.

“Just a second” Silvaaris said as he scribbled upon his pages.

“Mighty Silvaaris” he wrote down “delivers the death blow and saves Korizan and Lisus from the giants clutches”

“This is going to look great on stage!” he thought.

Character motivation is a bit of a funny thing. Maybe its because I have created so many PCs and NPCs over the years, but I find the usual “Dream of Glory”, “Looking for Money”, or “Out for Revenge”, character concepts to be rather dull at this point in my life. Surely there have to be reasons beyond fame, fortune, or vengeance out there to inspire the host of heroes that we all play. Yet far too often those very superficial and uninspiried tales fill the back-stories of our favourite PCs. Surely we can start coming up with something more interesting than that, right?

That’s were Silvaaris comes in for me. He had dreams of glory, but in a very different way. He never wanted to be known as the greatest hero in the land. Adventure, he thought, was a means to an end. Silvaaris was a bard that I created on time and remains my most favoured character that I’ve ever played, even if he did not last particularly long. He had great ambitions of fame and fortune, but not as a warrior, but as an actor and playwright.

Silvaaris had dreams of writing and performing in the greatest play of all time. It centred around a great adventurer embarking on fantastic voyages and performing heroic feats. However, the problem for Silvaaris was that he had no experience in this field and wanted to make his play as realistic as possible. As such, he decided to set off on a life of adventure and excitement in order to inspire his writings. The lead character in the story would also be named Silvaaris, but that was purely coincidental. It was a common name after all.

The first encounter that the group faced was a run-of-the-mill combat scene. A few goblins or something spring up and try to take on the party to no avail. I scribble down notes of the encounter, claiming (meta-game) to be the note-taker for the party, sinceo ne never knows what will be important later.

I write down the summary of the encounter as follows “Hundreds of golbins emerge. Party begins to panic. Silvaaris issues a commanding and profound speech to calm the party down. People struggle under the horde, but Silvaaris saves the day, single handedly slaying more goblins than he could count”.

Obviously, none of that happened. Silvaaris in fact had a strength of 8 and spent most of the encounter hiding, shotting his crossbow and signing to inspire. Hardly the stuff of legends, but that didn’t matter to Silvaaris, a little artistic freedom was necessary after all.

Sadly though, that evening while Silvaaris was on watch he heard a noise in the bushes. He went to investigate, only to discover a ghoul in the bushes. He rolled away and shot his crossbow (totally Matrix-style) before having the creature lunge at him and eventually tearing him apart.

When they searched my body, the DM forced me to hand over my notes. Which at that point had long filled a page, mostly with talk of how inferior they all were to the mighty Silvaaris. Needless to say the characters weren’t to pleased, but at least the players were.

I had great plans for the rest of Silvaaris adventuring career. I thought that the performance would have been a great role-playing opportunity, and I was really looking forward to getting him to begin method-acting in the middle of adventures. I really wanted to practice soliloquies at very inappropriate and potentially dangerous moments.

But alas, this one ended in a tragedy. It may not have been the story that Silvaaris wanted, but it most certainly is one worth telling.

Until next time,

G

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